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Albino Ice Blue Cichlid 5cm

RM 7.00
Albino Ice Blue Cichlid 5cm Ratings: 0 - 0 votes
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Name Albino Ice Blue Cichlid Fish
Scientific  Name Maylandia greshakei
Temperature 24 - 28°C
PH range  7.2 -8.6
Diet Omnivore
Habitat Fully Aquatic
Temperament Aggressive
Max Size 5.0"

Description :

The  Maylandia greshakei Ice Bluei has the typical elongated, muscular Mbuna cichlid body. In nature they typically reach about 4 3/4 inches (12 cm) in length, but are often larger in the home aquarium, attaining lengths just over 5" (13.4 cm). Most Mbunas can live up to around 10 years with proper care.The males are more colorful than the females. Males have an overall ice blue color with very faded vertical bars on the body. The dorsal fin and the top half of the tail fin are orange and there are several egg spots on their anal fin. This coloring makes them easy to identify. Females are a drab color of brown-gray, with slightly more obvious vertical bars. Sometimes the females can be a pink coloring with a hint of the blue on their sides.All cichlids share a common feature that some saltwater fish such as wrasses and parrotfish have and that is a well-developed pharyngeal set of teeth that are in the throat, along with their regular teeth. Cichlids have spiny rays in the back parts of the anal, dorsal, pectoral, and pelvic fins to help discourage predators. The front part of these fins are soft and perfect for precise positions and effortless movements in the water as opposed to fast swimming.

Breeding :

The Maylandia greshakei Ice Blue has been bred in captivity. Obtain six to eight young fry and once mature, feed two times a day to condition them to breed. If they will not spawn, then that usually means there is a very aggressive fish in the tank. Removing that aggressive fish will prompt a more relaxed atmosphere and encourage spawning.The male will dig a pit down to the bottom of the glass. He will then chase the females around shaking and extending his fins, showing exaggerated colors to attract them. He does not single out a female and rough her up, but waits until a female becomes gravid with eggs and willingly follows him to the pit. They will swim in a tight circle and the female will then deposit her eggs at a rate of one or two at a time and then picks them up in their mouth. The male will lay at an angle exposing the egg spots on his anal fin. The female, seeing the "eggs" will think she forgot a few and will try to pick them up. The male then releases milt which is taken into the mouth of the female, fertilizing the eggs. The female continues this routine until her mouth is full of fertilized eggs. This is one of the safest ways for a fish to spawn. It keeps the eggs safe from predation, which in Lake Malawi is brutal.

Social Behaviors :

The  Maylandia greshakei Ice Blue is only a moderately aggressive cichlid, but is not considered to be a community fish. They can be kept with other less aggressive, similarly tempered cichlids from Malawi. But do not put them with other Mbuna of similar shape and size as they will attack them and/or interbreed, which is not suggested. Do not house with Haplochromis as this cichlid, like other Mbunas, are too aggressive towards them. Also do not house with fish that eat mammal meat, as this is dangerous for your Mbuna to eat.They are best kept in a group of one male with two or three females. They will not tolerate other males of the same color, and especially no males that are the same species. They are not particularly hard on their females like some cichlids are, which adds to the joy of owning this pretty little fish.

Food & Feeding :

Many cichlids specialize in eating one type of food; notwithstanding, some of these specialized feeders are flexible and can be opportunistic feeders.

Habitat :

This is the primary location where the cichlid is found and is a generalization. This does not  mean a fish cannot be found in other habitats.

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